The Villages Genealogical Society
Facts, Tips & Tricks
 
Tips to help you discover and trace your genealogy.
 
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Listings: 1 to 8 of 8
1.  
The Social Security Death index is a master index file of deaths reported to the Social Security Administration. It has been kept since 1962, when operations were computerized. The index includes about 50 percent of deceased persons from 1962 to 1971 and about 85 percent of deceased persons from 1972 to 2005. It also includes a few deaths from 1937 to 1961.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
2.  
The "Social Security Death Index" is an online searchable database. It only includes the names of deceased individuals whose deaths were reported to Social Security. Beginning in 2014, rules governing the "Social Security Death Index" changed. Records for the most recent 3 years are not available.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
3.  
USCIS (U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services) was formerly known as INS (Immigration and Naturalization Service). Searching for Immigration and naturalization records is essential in genealogy research. The website which allows patrons to order index searches or record copies is at: CISHistory.Library@dhs.gov. Payment is required for searching the indexes, and then payment again to obtain copies of records located. 20th century records include: Certificate Files (C-Files); Registry Files; Visa Files; Alien Registration and A-Files.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
4.  
The National Genealogical Society, Washington, D.C. has a genealogical course available for national accreditation and sells both supplies and reprinted genealogies and other books.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
5.  
The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in Washington, DC and its Regional Branches, is the principal repository for records relating to the US federal government. These include the original paper copies of the federal census, all pre-World War I military records, Native American records, military service and pension records, naturalization records, ship passenger lists, land-entry case files, and homestead and bounty land warrant records. NARA's website is the place to begin research for federal records.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
6.  
National Personnel Records Center, St. Louis, MO., has U.S. military records for World War I or later. World War I draft registration cards are online, along with some of the World War II enlistment records. Some of the records in St. Louis were destroyed by fire, and they ask that you send the request for records back a second time since the first reply is computer-generated.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
7.  
Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. has manuscripts, publications and microfilms of a wide range of materials useful to genealogical research. Their website is free and easy to use.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
8.  
General Land Office is now called Bureau of Land Management of the United States Department of Interior. Some federal land records are here, some in the National Archives and some are in state and university libraries. Public domain land states are largely available on the Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office-Eastern States free website.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016