The Villages Genealogical Society
Facts, Tips & Tricks
Tips to help discover and trace your genealogy.
If you have a category or a tip recommendation, please let me know.
 
Filter by Category:
Timeframe:
Return to Category List
Listings Per Page: 

Listings: 1 to 16 of 16
1.  
Remember to source (document) everything you find on your ancestors. Undocumented genealogy is mythology. Most genealogy software will get you through the basics, Elizabeth Shown Mills has authored several very good books on the subject.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
2.  
A citation is a reference to a source of information.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
3.  
Use confidential information with discretion and sensitivity.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
4.  
Enter sources and notes in a consistent format.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
5.  
If you don't provide the sources for your information, then that information is practically worthless to other researchers.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
6.  
Source: Original This source is in its first recorded form. (ie: the original marriage record license)
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
7.  
Source: Authored An original work of an author based on their study and synthesizing of their findings.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
8.  
Source: Derivative Materials that offer alternate versions of the original: this source is abstracted, compiled, formed into a database, transcribed, translated or otherwise derived from the original.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
9.  
Evidence: Direct Information in this source seems to address the research question all by itself.evidence speaks to the point in question.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
10.  
Evidence Indirect: The information in this source does not directly answer the research question, but helps to answer the question when combined with information from other sources.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
11.  
Evidence Negative: The lack of information in this source infers an answer to this question.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
12.  
Evidence: I don't know! Information without a source is information that is not verified and should not be considered sound research or valid information.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
13.  
Information Primary: The information in this source contains details provided by someone with firsthand knowledge of the person, event, or situation. (ie: A Birth Certificate)
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
14.  
Information Secondary: The information in this source contains details provided by someone with secondhand (or more distant) knowledge of the person, event, or situation (hearsay, tradition, local lore, a birth date of a death certificate etc.) A Death Certificate can contain both primary and secondary source information.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
15.  
Use a Correspondence Log for both regular and electronic correspondence. This includes the name and address of the person to whom you have written, what you requested, the date the request was sent, and a column for the outcome. Remembering every letter written is impossible. Follow up if you don't get an answer within a month.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016
16.  
The Research Log is very important for the time when you share you data or decide to publish your work. You will need to know your sources for obtaining each piece of information. Be VERY specific with your information quoting authors, titles, pages, publishers, etc.
Last Updated: 22 March 2016